Read about first-hand accounts from MSF aid workers and patients.

Country/Region

November 20, 2014

Since April 2014, Swedish medical doctor Ann Sellberg has worked with pediatric HIV patients at the Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic in Epworth, Zimbabwe. All of Ann’s patients are under twenty years old. Many are orphans and have suffered stigma from their community—or even family—because they are HIV positive. Support groups help these young people to reclaim their dignity. Here, Ann remembers a particular patient at the clinic.

October 28, 2014

As a teenager, Gibson Chijaka was diagnosed with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Cases like Gibson's are attributed to TB’s highly contagious nature and the high rates of HIV in the region. While early detection and prompt treatment of confirmed cases is key to DR-TB prevention, treatment, and control, this form of TB is very difficult to treat compared to drug sensitive TB. It takes a long time and many pills to get cured, but Gibson went through it all.

November 24, 2009

During the response to Zimbabwe’s cholera epidemic earlier this year, medical teams from Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) started to work in prisons across the country to treat cholera patients and prevent the spread of the deadly disease. As the four-month intervention is concluding, MSF’s project coordinator in Zimbabwe, Pip Millard, gives insight into the challenge of curbing an outbreak in penitentiaries.

August 16, 2009

In Murwira Clinic, southeastern Zimbabwe, Dennis Taronga is receiving antiretroviral (ARV) therapy with the help of MSF. Taronga, a husband and father of three who used to work as a builder, contracted cholera in January 2009 in the historic cholera outbreak that infected nearly 100,000 people and left thousands dead. This is his story.