Read about first-hand accounts from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) aid workers and patients.


July 07, 2015

Since early May 2015, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been carrying out search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean Sea with two ships—the MY Phoenix (operated jointly with Migrant Offshore Aid Station) and the Bourbon Argos. MSF teams onboard work alongside search and rescue crews to provide medical assessment and care ranging from primary care to resuscitation and advanced life support. Here, patients rescued by MSF tell their stories.

July 07, 2015

The crew of the Bourbon Argos, a search and rescue ship deployed by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), has been working save lives in the Mediterranean since May 7, 2015. In June alone, MSF workers on the ship rescued 1,057 migrants from dilapidated boats as they attempted to reach Europe.

October 14, 2011

On October 13, Dr. Gabriele Rossi, MSF emergency coordinator, discussed the very serious situation in Sirte.

August 25, 2011

MSF Head of Mission Jonathan Whittall describes what he and the MSF team in Tripoli are seeing as the fighting intensifies and the number of wounded grows in the capital.

July 05, 2011

Doctors and other hospital staff in Libya are highly dedicated, but there is a lack of inpatient capacity in all areas of care. MSF is helping to fill the gaps in surgery, obstetrics, and neonatal care.

June 29, 2011

John*, 15, his brother Matthew*, 3, and their mother left Libya on a boat headed for Italy when the war began. They lost their mother when the boat capsized. 

June 29, 2011

Mouhaydin, 27, worked as a laborer and a cleaner in Libya before the war. He arrived at Shousha camp in March with his wife. She died on a boat to Europe in April. 

June 29, 2011

Abdul, 23, spent four months in a desert prison in Libya before escaping to Shousha camp on the Tunisian border. Fearing insecurity in Shousha, he says he is ready to go back to Libya.

June 19, 2011

"It was very much a teaching mission—it was the first time, I did this sort of teaching. In any other mission, you do the job on your own, but in Misrata, I was able to disseminate my knowledge."