Read about first-hand accounts from MSF aid workers and patients.

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June 09, 2015

Around 25,000 people who fled violence near Lake Chad in early May are currently living in precarious conditions in camps in Bosso and Nguigmi, Niger. Here, Aissami Abdou, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) field coordinator in Diffa, discusses their plight:

June 09, 2015

From January through mid-May of 2015, more than 35,000 migrants fleeing violence and privation in their home countries crossed the Mediterranean between North Africa and Italy. Most experience terrible conditions during their voyage.

May 26, 2015

Heading for waters off the Libyan coast aboard the rescue ship MY Phoenix, on which Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working in partnership with MOAS, doctor Erna Rijnierse describes her work caring for migrants and refugees rescued in the Mediterranean Sea.

May 20, 2015

Ahlam* is a 22-year-old mother from Dara’a governorate in Syria. She is the mother of two children, both of whom were born at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital for mother and child care in Irbid, Jordan. Here, Ahlam tells her story and recounts some of the challenges she has faced since she crossed the border to Jordan in 2012. 

May 08, 2015

With the arrival of thousands of people to the town of Diffa, Niger, fleeing attacks by Boko Haram around Lake Chad, MSF has stepped up its response in the area to assist this population. Abdalla Hussein, MSF’s emergency coordinator in Diffa, talks about MSF’s work in recent months.

April 23, 2015

Dr. Chiara Montaldo is coordinating MSF’s efforts in Sicily to provide medical and psychological care to migrants rescued from boats in the Mediterranean. This account originally appeared in The Guardian.

September 26, 2014

Most shelters are dry and road access to the camp has improved, but conditions remain precarious for tens of thousands.

August 08, 2014

 

In South Sudan, 40,000 people are crowded into a flooded United Nations compound in Bentiu. Living conditions are horrific but it is the only refuge they have from the civil war that broke out last December. Here, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) emergency coordinator Ivan Gayton describes the situation.

July 15, 2014

 

In March, clinical psychologist Charlotte Yence returned from a five-month mission with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in northern Iraq, where MSF has worked in Syrian refugee camps since 2013. She set up mental health care programmes in the Kawargosk, Qushtapa, and Darashakran camps, and here she tells us about some of her encounters:

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