Read about first-hand accounts from MSF aid workers and patients.

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An MSF project coordinator describes the devastation she saw at MSF’s ransacked hospital in Leer.

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As intense violence continues to spread throughout the northwest of Central African Republic (CAR), Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams have opened a new project in Bouar, a town that has been severely impacted by the conflict and its consequences. Today, around 6,000 people remain trapped and unable to flee.

For the last month, MSF has been supporting the hospital in Bouar. Florent Uzzeni, deputy emergency program manager, is currently in CAR and describes what he is seeing unfold on the ground.

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Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been treating prisoners and ex-prisoners for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the Donetsk region of Ukraine since June 2012. In this interview, MSF Field Coordinator Paola Mermati, discusses the challenges faced by the MSF team—and by their patients.

How are these patients different from others?

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Côme Niyomgabo, a 40-year-old Burundian, recently finished a nine-month mission coordinating the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) project to reduce child mortality in Bouza, in Niger’s Tahoua district. He discusses his experience in this interview.

What is the situation in Bouza at present?

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Over the past seven weeks, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team has run mobile clinics by boat to deliver medical and humanitarian aid to five islands south of Guiuan that were affected by Typhoon Haiyan.

The team includes a doctor, two nurses, a psychologist, a translator, and two Filipino health workers. They can treat up to 200 patients per day, doing minor operations on the islands and referring complicated cases to MSF’s hospital in Guiuan. 

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Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, has been convulsed by violence for weeks, but most of the city’s hospitals are no longer functioning. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs the only trauma unit in the city, at Community Hospital, where staff have treated more than 800 patients—most with bullet or knife wounds—since fighting broke out in early December. Here, project coordinator Jessie Gaffric, who manages MSF’s operations at Community, describes the situation:

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By Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF General Director

When I left South Sudan ten years ago, having worked here for four, I left feeling hopeful. A ceasefire had been signed (between Sudan and opposition forces in the south) and a peace-agreement was under discussion. A few years later South Sudan became an independent country, a master of its destiny.

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Over the past seven weeks, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team has run mobile clinics by boat to deliver medical and humanitarian aid to five islands south of Guiuan that were affected by Typhoon Haiyan.

The team includes a doctor, two nurses, a psychologist, a translator, and two Filipino health workers. They can treat up to 200 patients per day, doing minor operations on the islands and referring complicated cases to MSF’s hospital in Guiuan. 

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Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor Natalie Roberts spent two months working in the Philippines, running MSF’s inflatable hospital in Tacloban. Here, she describes her experience.

I arrived in Tacloban a week after the typhoon. As soon as the town came into view from the air, the level of devastation became apparent. The runway was surrounded by debris—cars, bits of tin roofing, broken wood, as well as aid packages and military planes. Airport departures was just a hole in the wall, partially covered by mangled barbed wire.

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In Hebron and East Jerusalem, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs a medical and psychosocial program for people suffering from conflict-related trauma. MSF teams focus on people with psychological distress (acute stress, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic syndromes, depression) related to violent incidents with Israeli settlers, the Israeli Army, or other Palestinian parties. Here, an MSF psychologist describes a session with a patient in Hebron.

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