Below is a comprehensive archive of press releases from MSF-USA. Use the options in the boxes below to filter results based on your preferences.


July 05, 2017

Two days ahead of the G20 summit in Germany, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and the Stop TB Partnership released a report that shows countries are lagging behind in tackling tuberculosis (TB), introducing the best diagnostic devices, and implementing globally-recommended policies. The third edition of the “Out of Step” report reviews TB policies and practices in 29[1] countries–which account for 82 percent of the global TB burden–and shows that countries can do much more to prevent, diagnose, and treat people affected by TB.

April 27, 2016

MSF hands over global petition as volunteers place 2,500 flowers in front of Pfizer’s headquarters in New York, representing the number of kids who die of pneumonia each day.

February 24, 2016

International medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today expressed great concern at the high price announced for the new tuberculosis (TB) drug delamanid. Japanese pharmaceutical company Otsuka said that it would make delamanid available to some developing countries at a price of $1,700 per treatment course.

May 20, 2009

MSF denounces the growing pressure applied by Thailand’s army to force the 5,000 Hmong refugees living in Huai Nam Khao camp, in northern Thailand, to return to Laos. Increasingly restrictive measures have forced MSF to put a stop to its assistance activities after some four years of presence in the camp.

June 25, 2008

Bangkok/Paris, June 25, 2008 —An estimated 800 ethnic Lao Hmong refugees were forcibly returned to Laos by the Thai government on Sunday, June 22, and the Thai authorities have stated publicly that they intend to proceed over the coming days with further repatriations to Laos from among the remaining 6,700 refugees in the Huai Nam Khao camp in Thailand’s Petchabun Province. The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is calling once again on the governments of Thailand and Laos to immediately stop all forced repatriations of the Hmong refugees.

December 01, 2007

Geneva/Bangkok, December 1, 2007 – Failure to diagnose and treat cytomegalovirus retinitis (CMV) in people with AIDS is leading to unnecessary blindness, according to a paper published today in the journal PLoS Medicine. The authors found in pilot studies that CMV retinitis, which has been dramatically reduced in wealthy countries since the advent of antiretroviral therapy, occurred in 23%, 27%, and 32% of patients with advanced AIDS in Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand respectively. By training clinicians to screen and taking steps to make the best treatment affordable, the authors argue that CMV diagnosis and treatment can easily be integrated into existing AIDS treatment programs.

October 31, 2007

Bangkok/Paris, October 31, 2007 - MSF calls on the Thai government to halt all forced repatriation proceedings against the 7,500 ethnic Hmong refugees from Laos who are currently confined to a camp in northern Thailand's Petchabun province. The refugees, who claim to have fled violence and persecution in Laos, are deeply fearful of being returned to their country.

March 15, 2007

Bangkok/New York/Geneva, 15 March 2007 — The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today denounced Abbott Laboratories' decision not to market its new medicines in Thailand. The Chicago-based multinational pharmaceutical company has cited Thailand's use of compulsory licenses as a reason for taking the drastic measures. MSF notes that the use of compulsory licenses to improve access to essential medicines is consistent with international laws, and is concerned that patients will bear the brunt of Abbott's harsh decision.

November 29, 2006

Bangkok/New York, November 29, 2006 — Thailand today for the first time announced it will issue a compulsory license for use by the government to improve access to a key HIV/AIDS medicine, efavirenz. The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) welcomes this important move and urges the government to issue such licenses for the production of other essential medicines.

January 11, 2006

Bangkok, January 11, 2006 — As talks take place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, this week on the intellectual property provisions of a proposed US-Thailand Free Trade Agreement, the international medical organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warns that acceptance of the US proposal could restrict access to essential medicines in Thailand and endanger the country's national HIV/AIDS treatment program.