Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

October 04, 2017

In 2017, nearly half of MSF's patients in Serbia were under 18; almost all of them were refugees and asylum-seekers who were traveling unaccompanied or became separated from their parents. Minors are supposed to be protected by the system, but many of these young people report violent abuse by European Union border authorities and police.

March 27, 2017

Cervical cancer rates are on the rise worldwide, but the brunt of the burden falls on low- and middle-income countries, where more than 80 percent of cases occur and many women have little or no access to health services for prevention, curative treatment, or palliative care. 

March 27, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began supporting the Zimbabwean health ministry in 2016, rolling out services to prevent cervical cancer at health centers in Gutu district. MSF teams provide mentoring, ongoing training, and supervision for Zimbabwean nurses, as well as equipment and technical support. Here are stories from some of our patients:

March 21, 2017

Winile is a multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patient with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Swaziland, and one of the many who have lost their hearing due to the toxicity of available MDR-TB drugs. Through an MSF program in Swaziland, she has learned sign language so she can continue to communicate.

February 23, 2017

"You see, I am healed," says Tholakele as she walks around her ward demonstrating her recovery. "Even my legs don't give me problems anymore. Now I can walk perfectly. I walk around the hospital; go out for fresh air and come back when I’m ready."

Tholakele, 39, has drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) and started treatment in May 2016 at the Moneni National TB Hospital, supported by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in central Swaziland.

February 16, 2017

MSF has supported the Zimbabwe Prisons and Correctional Services (ZPCS) to provide diagnosis, treatment, care, and support to inmates with psychiatric disorders, HIV, and tuberculosis at Chikurubi Maximum Security prison's male and female psychiatric units since May 2012. MSF also supports eight other selected prisons in the Mashonaland provinces with mental health training programs.

January 19, 2017

NEW YORK, JANUARY 20, 2017—The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began a new clinical trial this week in Uzbekistan to develop a radically improved course of treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB).

The trial aims to find a treatment regimen for DR-TB that is drastically shorter, more effective, and causes fewer side effects than the current treatment options.

November 30, 2016

It’s 8 a.m. and Alice Otiato is walking to Epworth Clinic in Zimbabwe in the bright morning sun, smiling as she greets patients and staff. She stops at the Day Clinic where sick patients are assessed, and quickly scans the room. Her eyes fix on a baby, only a few months old, hanging listlessly over her mother's shoulder.

July 22, 2016

On March 9, 2016, European leaders announced that the so-called "Balkan route" was closed after Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Slovenia completely shut their borders to people trying to pass through to seek asylum in northern Europe. For thousands of people fleeing violence and persecution in their home countries, this route represented one of very few ways to reach safety and protection in Europe.

June 02, 2016

In many contexts where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works, key populations (also referred to as most-at-risk populations) such as sex workers and men who have sex with men have a higher risk of contracting HIV and a lower ability to access antiretroviral care due to stigma, discrimination, and their high mobility.

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