Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

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April 09, 2018

Being vaccinated against potentially fatal diseases like diphtheria, measles, whooping cough, meningitis, pneumonia, yellow fever, and others is a rite of passage for many children the world over. But in northern Mali’s vast desert region of Kidal, where insecurity, isolation, and limited health infrastructure hinder access to care for many communities, protecting children from these illnesses can be difficult.

March 23, 2018

Khumbulani, 16, has multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). In 2017, he lost his hearing. In early 2018, his eyesight faded. The side effects were not from the disease, but from Khumbulani's treatment. Better drugs for resistant strains of TB exist, but too few people have access to them. It's time to #StepUpForTB

February 14, 2018

New research published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal by the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides strong evidence that a combination of two new drugs for tuberculosis (TB)—the world’s leading infectious disease killer—could be used to treat drug-resistant (DR-TB) forms of the disease.

October 25, 2016

South Africa has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis (TB) and drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the world, with more than 20,000 people diagnosed with DR-TB in 2015. Yet the current DR-TB treatment regimen—which consists of a combination of multiple pills and daily injections—is only successful in about half of all people who receive it. New drugs such as delamanid offer the opportunity to provide more successful, tolerable treatment regimens to patients with few other options available.

September 14, 2016

New report exposes pharmaceutical industry failings and highlights new ways of researching and developing medicines that address public health needs.

July 19, 2016

Durban, South Africa—Global HIV/AIDS leaders at the International AIDS Conference in Durban must develop and implement an action plan to address the critical lack of access to HIV treatment in countries in West and Central Africa where coverage remains below 30 percent, said the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Tuesday.

May 11, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) pediatrics advisor Dr. David Green recently arrived in Koutiala, southern Mali, to begin an extended visit to one of MSF’s largest pediatric programs at Koutiala Reference Hospital. Here, he describes a day working with the hospital’s Malian doctors, whose wealth of experience keeps the six-year-old project running.

April 25, 2016

A recent survey by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) shows that the national program’s vaccination coverage for all antigens has increased by at least 50 percent in children under five years of age in the district of Ansongo, in the northern Mali’s Gao region. This improvement has been achieved thanks to the implementation last year of a strategy combining seasonal malaria chemoprevention, rapid nutritional assessment, and vaccination.

April 20, 2016

Globally, the years 2000 to 2015 saw the scaling-up of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), with a 35 percent decrease in AIDS-related deaths since 2005. A record number of almost 16 million people living with HIV (PLHIV) have been initiated on ART as of mid-2015, three in four of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa, where the needs are most acute. Civil society and public health services alike have rallied to bring new evidence-based treatments and best practices to PLHIV.

March 21, 2016

New York/Geneva, March 21, 2016—Two years after two new drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB)—the first in over 50 years—were conditionally approved for use, only two percent of the 150,000 people who need them most have been able to access them, according to Doctors Without Borders’ new edition of DR-TB Drugs Under the Microscope.

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