Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

December 01, 2017

For many people in rural South Sudan, HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) is nearly impossible to obtain, partly because war has forced many to flee to isolated locations where treatment options are limited or nonexistent. But in Yambio County—in the southwest—things are different as a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) pilot project is providing same-day care to many people living with HIV.

July 05, 2017

ZEMIO, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, JULY 5, 2017—More than 15,000 people have been displaced—with many wounded and unable to reach medical care—following clashes in Zemio, a town in eastern Central African Republic (CAR) where the medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs an HIV program. Zemio had been spared from much of the conflict raging in other regions of CAR until last week, when fighting broke out. 

November 30, 2016

It’s 8 a.m. and Alice Otiato is walking to Epworth Clinic in Zimbabwe in the bright morning sun, smiling as she greets patients and staff. She stops at the Day Clinic where sick patients are assessed, and quickly scans the room. Her eyes fix on a baby, only a few months old, hanging listlessly over her mother's shoulder.

August 11, 2016

MSF first provided free medical care in Central African Republic (CAR) in 1997, at a time when mortality rates in some regions were up to five times the emergency threshold. In the years since, CAR has continued to face a situation of chronic and prolonged health emergency.

June 02, 2016

In many contexts where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works, key populations (also referred to as most-at-risk populations) such as sex workers and men who have sex with men have a higher risk of contracting HIV and a lower ability to access antiretroviral care due to stigma, discrimination, and their high mobility.

May 20, 2016

Noah Traoré was the first person in the Tombolia neighborhood to have his finger pricked at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) mobile clinic. "As the head of this neighborhood, I have to set an example," he says. "I love my community, so it is my duty to encourage them to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS."

May 17, 2016

There is a book kept under lock and key at all times in the tented HIV and tuberculosis (TB) ward of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Bentiu, South Sudan. It doesn’t look like much—its blue ink has started to fade and its pages emit a strong smell of must, mold, and swamp water.

May 18, 2015

Despite the tremendous progresses made in the fight against HIV/AIDS, many patients in West and Central Africa still struggle to get the treatment they need. Barely a third of the people in those two regions who need anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment receive it.

September 19, 2014


Every month, six neighbors from the same village, all of them HIV-positive, and stable patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART)—the treatment that keeps the virus in check—take turns picking up medicine for the others. This is the essence of so-called Community ART Groups (CAG), a simple, inexpensive initiative benefiting both members of the group and health facilities, started by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in 2013 in Zimbabwe’s Tsholotsho district.