Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

July 05, 2017

Two days ahead of the G20 summit in Germany, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and the Stop TB Partnership released a report that shows countries are lagging behind in tackling tuberculosis (TB), introducing the best diagnostic devices, and implementing globally-recommended policies. The third edition of the “Out of Step” report reviews TB policies and practices in 29[1] countries–which account for 82 percent of the global TB burden–and shows that countries can do much more to prevent, diagnose, and treat people affected by TB.

March 27, 2017

Cervical cancer rates are on the rise worldwide, but the brunt of the burden falls on low- and middle-income countries, where more than 80 percent of cases occur and many women have little or no access to health services for prevention, curative treatment, or palliative care. 

March 27, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began supporting the Zimbabwean health ministry in 2016, rolling out services to prevent cervical cancer at health centers in Gutu district. MSF teams provide mentoring, ongoing training, and supervision for Zimbabwean nurses, as well as equipment and technical support. Here are stories from some of our patients:

February 16, 2017

MSF has supported the Zimbabwe Prisons and Correctional Services (ZPCS) to provide diagnosis, treatment, care, and support to inmates with psychiatric disorders, HIV, and tuberculosis at Chikurubi Maximum Security prison's male and female psychiatric units since May 2012. MSF also supports eight other selected prisons in the Mashonaland provinces with mental health training programs.

November 30, 2016

It’s 8 a.m. and Alice Otiato is walking to Epworth Clinic in Zimbabwe in the bright morning sun, smiling as she greets patients and staff. She stops at the Day Clinic where sick patients are assessed, and quickly scans the room. Her eyes fix on a baby, only a few months old, hanging listlessly over her mother's shoulder.

June 02, 2016

In many contexts where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works, key populations (also referred to as most-at-risk populations) such as sex workers and men who have sex with men have a higher risk of contracting HIV and a lower ability to access antiretroviral care due to stigma, discrimination, and their high mobility.

March 08, 2016

These stories have been bravely shared by women and girls cared for by MSF in our medical humanitarian projects. Each woman, or child in the company of their guardian, has given consent for their stories to be shared. Their hope, and ours, is that you can bear witness to their suffering, and contribute to breaking down the barriers to addressing sexual violence.

February 24, 2016

International medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today expressed great concern at the high price announced for the new tuberculosis (TB) drug delamanid. Japanese pharmaceutical company Otsuka said that it would make delamanid available to some developing countries at a price of $1,700 per treatment course.

August 05, 2015

In places with high HIV or tuberculosis (TB) burdens and significant shortages of human resources for health care work, lay counsellors have become extremely important. They provide HIV testing and counselling and help patients get through difficult challenges in adhering to HIV and TB treatments. But their crucial involvement in treatment programs is critically underfunded.

November 20, 2014

Since April 2014, Swedish medical doctor Ann Sellberg has worked with pediatric HIV patients at the Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic in Epworth, Zimbabwe. All of Ann’s patients are under twenty years old. Many are orphans and have suffered stigma from their community—or even family—because they are HIV positive. Support groups help these young people to reclaim their dignity. Here, Ann remembers a particular patient at the clinic.

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