MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

November 10, 2016

Today is World Pneumonia Day. It's a somewhat abstract concept, associating a specific disease with a specific day, but the reality of pneumonia is very scary and dangerous, and possibly even deadly, for millions and millions of people around the globe.

Each year, pneumonia takes the lives of nearly one million children worldwide, often for want of a vaccine. There is in fact a vaccine to prevent it, something that's commonly administered to children in many western countries, but it’s too expensive for many countries to afford.

November 04, 2016

Crowds draw into the local schools and churches of little villages, nestled against lush forests. Mothers wait with their children, lined up on wooden benches. Everyone is quiet—surprisingly enough for a long line of people made up mostly of the under-6-years-old crowd. But the closer the children get to the nurses, the more their curiosity morphs into terror. 

The nurses have a process: open the mouth for the oral polio vaccine, prepare one leg for the pentavalent, the other one for the pneumonia vaccine, and, "Jab, jab." 

November 10, 2016

Today is World Pneumonia Day. It's a somewhat abstract concept, associating a specific disease with a specific day, but the reality of pneumonia is very scary and dangerous, and possibly even deadly, for millions and millions of people around the globe.

Each year, pneumonia takes the lives of nearly one million children worldwide, often for want of a vaccine. There is in fact a vaccine to prevent it, something that's commonly administered to children in many western countries, but it’s too expensive for many countries to afford.

November 04, 2016

Crowds draw into the local schools and churches of little villages, nestled against lush forests. Mothers wait with their children, lined up on wooden benches. Everyone is quiet—surprisingly enough for a long line of people made up mostly of the under-6-years-old crowd. But the closer the children get to the nurses, the more their curiosity morphs into terror. 

The nurses have a process: open the mouth for the oral polio vaccine, prepare one leg for the pentavalent, the other one for the pneumonia vaccine, and, "Jab, jab."