MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Country/Region

Topic

February 11, 2008

One week after the fighting ended, things are slowly getting back to normal in N'Djamena. The streets are starting to fill again, even if many shops in the town center remain closed. In the hospitals too, the worst of the crisis has passed. While a good number of people have returned to N'Djamena, thousands of families do not yet dare to go home, and continue to survive in precarious conditions across the border in Cameroon.

February 07, 2008

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to provide medical assistance to civilians affected by recent fighting in N'Djamena, Chad's capital city, as well as to refugees who have fled the combat to Cameroon, and displaced populations in the east of the country.

February 05, 2008

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to provide medical assistance to civilians affected by recent fighting in N'Djamena, Chad's capital city, as well as refugees who have fled the combat to Cameroon, and displaced populations in the east of the country.

February 03, 2008

MSF treated 70 wounded in N'Djamena, the Chad capital, over the weekend, but many hundreds of other wounded are reported to be in other hospitals in the city. Over the weekend, access to hospitals was limited due to the ongoing fighting. MSF has been unable to access the other hospitals as the roads are blocked by the masses of people fleeing from the city.

January 30, 2008

Providing Surgical Care to Victims of Violence in Southern Nigeria

April 01, 2007

In this month's edition, listen to stories on how MSF is treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in the former Soviet state of Georgia, responding to the latest outbreaks of violence in the central African nation of Chad, and assisting victims of violence in Nigeria's volatile Niger Delta region.

View external media

October 26, 1999

Lagos, Nigeria, October 27, 1999 — The international humanitarian aid organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today announced the start of a malaria and fever program in the oil-rich Niger Delta, the most conflict-ridden region in Nigeria. Malaria is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the area. The population of Bayelsa State has limited access to health care, and ethnic clashes and civil unrest are pervasive.

This six-month progress report reviews the steps taken to achieve the Action Plan agreed by delegates at the International Conference on Lead Poisoning. It finds that on nearly all agreed action points, very little has materialized.

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February 11, 2008

One week after the fighting ended, things are slowly getting back to normal in N'Djamena. The streets are starting to fill again, even if many shops in the town center remain closed. In the hospitals too, the worst of the crisis has passed. While a good number of people have returned to N'Djamena, thousands of families do not yet dare to go home, and continue to survive in precarious conditions across the border in Cameroon.

February 07, 2008

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to provide medical assistance to civilians affected by recent fighting in N'Djamena, Chad's capital city, as well as to refugees who have fled the combat to Cameroon, and displaced populations in the east of the country.

February 05, 2008

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to provide medical assistance to civilians affected by recent fighting in N'Djamena, Chad's capital city, as well as refugees who have fled the combat to Cameroon, and displaced populations in the east of the country.

February 03, 2008

MSF treated 70 wounded in N'Djamena, the Chad capital, over the weekend, but many hundreds of other wounded are reported to be in other hospitals in the city. Over the weekend, access to hospitals was limited due to the ongoing fighting. MSF has been unable to access the other hospitals as the roads are blocked by the masses of people fleeing from the city.

January 30, 2008

Providing Surgical Care to Victims of Violence in Southern Nigeria

April 01, 2007

In this month's edition, listen to stories on how MSF is treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in the former Soviet state of Georgia, responding to the latest outbreaks of violence in the central African nation of Chad, and assisting victims of violence in Nigeria's volatile Niger Delta region.

View external media

October 26, 1999

Lagos, Nigeria, October 27, 1999 — The international humanitarian aid organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today announced the start of a malaria and fever program in the oil-rich Niger Delta, the most conflict-ridden region in Nigeria. Malaria is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity in the area. The population of Bayelsa State has limited access to health care, and ethnic clashes and civil unrest are pervasive.

This six-month progress report reviews the steps taken to achieve the Action Plan agreed by delegates at the International Conference on Lead Poisoning. It finds that on nearly all agreed action points, very little has materialized.

Pages