Delivering Health Care and a Baby in Nepal

First baby delivered by an MSF surgical team in MoH hospital in Bhaktapur and Store.
MSF
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Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams have begun running mobile medical clinics by helicopter to remote villages in the mountains to the north of Kathmandu. Many villages have been completely or partially destroyed and people are living under makeshift shelters. The earthquake and subsequent avalanches have cut off access to many villages so people are stuck with no way out.

An MSF team visits heavily affected villages in the mountains to the north-west of Kathmandu by helicopter, where little or no assistance has reached. They did a health and damage assessment and provided basic medical assistance to patients. While the most critically injured people were evacuated in the days immediately after the earthquake, those remaining have been trapped in their villages as roads and walking tracks have been cut off by avalanches and landslides. MSF's teams are seeing people in need of basic healthcare, as well as a number of people presenting with wounds sustained in the earthquake that have now become infected.
Corinne Baker/MSF
After doing a health and damage assessment, an MSF team is setting up a clinic in Dhading district, a heavily affected area in the mountains to the north-west of Kathmandu, which is only reachable by helicopter and where little or no assistance has reached. While the most critically injured people were evacuated in the days immediately after the earthquake, those remaining have been trapped in their villages as roads and walking tracks have been cut off by avalanches and landslides. MSF's teams are seeing people in need of basic healthcare, as well as a number of people presenting with wounds sustained in the earthquake that have now become infected. The team will work to spread the word in the surrounding villages that people can now come to the clinic to receive care.
Jean Pletinckx/MSF
After doing a health and damage assessment, an MSF team is setting up a clinic in Dhading district, a heavily affected area in the mountains to the north-west of Kathmandu, which is only reachable by helicopter and where little or no assistance has reached. While the most critically injured people were evacuated in the days immediately after the earthquake, those remaining have been trapped in their villages as roads and walking tracks have been cut off by avalanches and landslides. MSF's teams are seeing people in need of basic healthcare, as well as a number of people presenting with wounds sustained in the earthquake that have now become infected. The team will work to spread the word in the surrounding villages that people can now come to the clinic to receive care.
Jean Pletinckx/MSF
A giant earthquake struck Nepal on the morning of Saturday April 25th. Thousands are confirmed dead with many more injured and homeless.MSF teams and equipment have already arrived in the country, and more are on their way. Kathmandu has experienced relatively little destruction, with the vast majority of buildings still standing. However, many people are sleeping outside in tents and makeshift shelters as they are afraid to be inside due to aftershocks. This is a concern given that storms are expected over the coming days.
An MSF team visits heavily affected villages in the mountains to the north-west of Kathmandu by helicopter, where little or no assistance has reached. They did a health and damage assessment and provided basic medical assistance to patients. While the most critically injured people were evacuated in the days immediately after the earthquake, those remaining have been trapped in their villages as roads and walking tracks have been cut off by avalanches and landslides. MSF's teams are seeing people in need of basic healthcare, as well as a number of people presenting with wounds sustained in the earthquake that have now become infected.
Corinne Baker/MSF
After doing a health and damage assessment, an MSF team is setting up a clinic in Dhading district, a heavily affected area in the mountains to the north-west of Kathmandu, which is only reachable by helicopter and where little or no assistance has reached. While the most critically injured people were evacuated in the days immediately after the earthquake, those remaining have been trapped in their villages as roads and walking tracks have been cut off by avalanches and landslides. MSF's teams are seeing people in need of basic healthcare, as well as a number of people presenting with wounds sustained in the earthquake that have now become infected. The team will work to spread the word in the surrounding villages that people can now come to the clinic to receive care.
Jean Pletinckx/MSF
First baby delivered by an MSF surgical team in MoH hospital in Bhaktapur and Store.
MSF
First baby delivered by an MSF surgical team in MoH hospital in Bhaktapur (photo taken by OT nurse Yuko) and Store.
MSF