Fighting Cholera in Tete, Mozambique

MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Cholera patients are treated at the the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district. Dr. Claudio Machalela (L) is performing an evalutation over the condition of his patient. He is an AIDS pediatric specialist. He came here because he heard that MSF was in need for doctors in this area. Mozambique is one of the countries with less clinicians and nurses per habitant (5.6 clinicians/100,000; and 26.3 nurses/100,000; well below the international standards of 20/100,000; 100/100,000 respectively Dr. Claudio Machalela was on holidays so he answered the call, initially for two weeks that he just extended on a third. It’s his fourth experience on cholera response, all in Mozambique. Mozambique is one of the countries with the lowest number of health professionals in Africa, and the few in Tete province mostly work in the public sector; there are no « freelance » doctors or nurses that could be mobilized quickly for an emergency response.
Luca Sola
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Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting health authorities in Mozambique in tackling an outbreak of cholera, assisting with case management; health staff, including rapid response teams for surges in new cases; community education; and water and sanitation activities in affected areas.

MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Cholera patients are treated at the the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district which is the most affected area in the country. The Mozambican cholera outbreak started in December 2014. Since the beginning of the cholera outbreak there have been more than 7400 registered cases and more than 55 deaths recorded. By March 31st MSF Cholera Treatment Centers in Mozambique had received 3,581 patients.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Caretakers and patients, arriving at the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. A Mozambican women enters, to visit her husband, in the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district which is the most affected area in the country. The Mozambican cholera outbreak started in December 2014. Since the beginning of the cholera outbreak there have been more than 7400 registered cases and more than 55 deaths recorded. By March 31st MSF’s Cholera treatment centers in Mozambique had received 3,581 patients.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Cholera patients are treated at the the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district which is the most affected area in the country. Minosta Francisco holds her grandson (Nelito Feliz, 5yo) hands while doctors are treating him with intravenous hydration.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Cholera patients are treated at the the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district. Dr. Claudio Machalela (L) is performing an evalutation over the condition of his patient. He is an AIDS pediatric specialist. He came here because he heard that MSF was in need for doctors in this area. Mozambique is one of the countries with less clinicians and nurses per habitant (5.6 clinicians/100,000; and 26.3 nurses/100,000; well below the international standards of 20/100,000; 100/100,000 respectively Dr. Claudio Machalela was on holidays so he answered the call, initially for two weeks that he just extended on a third. It’s his fourth experience on cholera response, all in Mozambique. Mozambique is one of the countries with the lowest number of health professionals in Africa, and the few in Tete province mostly work in the public sector; there are no « freelance » doctors or nurses that could be mobilized quickly for an emergency response.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Jacinta Fernando with her son, Midio Foster, 1y7m years old. After around 8h after arriving at MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) CTC (Cholera Treatment Center), thanks to the standard rehydration protocol, Midio has almost recovered and he will able to come back home two days later.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. TETE. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency. Renato Souza, from Brazil, MSF field coordinator for the cholera emergency reponse mission, performs a check up in the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF and co-managed with the ministry of Health.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. March 07, 2015. . Cholera emergency. Daniel Bila ©, 71yo, from Samoa Machel area, being treated in the CTC (Cholera Treatment Center) set up by MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières) and co-managed with the Mozambican ministry of Health in Tete district which is the most affected area in the country.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. March 05, 2015. Cholera emergency.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. March 07, 2015. Floods aftermath. Cholera emergency. Unidade Chimadzi C, in the Sansao Mutemba Bario, which is one of the most critical areas in Tete for what concerns hygienic conditions and percentage of cholera registered cases.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. Bairro Samora Machel. March 05, 2015. Ana Maria Jomaze, MSF counsellor, health promotion team, walks in Samoa Machel as she explain to the local population how to prevent cholera. Hygiene is a key part for the care of patients suffering from cholera and it is also important in order to prevent the spread of a massive outbreak. Quote « We’ve been going around the villages spreading information on cholera for three weeks. We don’t get tired of repeating the same thing every day because as long as the disease keeps increasing there is no other choice ». « I’m hopeful because some people adhere to the education messages we are passing, even if it’s not everyone. But we won’t stop until the situation gets better. The situation is changing, but with difficulty. Concerning latrines, people are changing their habits, but only a little bit. Usually when we tell them how important it is, they tell us: « well, give us money and we could build it ». But there is no budget for this. People also say that the soil is hard here, so it’s difficult to build latrines. But that’s not the case everywhere. The main problem is people’s minds ».
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. March 06, 2015. Gabriela, MSF counsellor, health promotion team, gives a speech in Dégué village, to explain to the local population how to prevent cholera. Hygiene is a key part for the care of patients suffering from cholera and it is also important in order to prevent the spread of a massive outbreak.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. March 06, 2015. Gabriela, MSF counsellor, health promotion team, performs a Certeza (chlorine) distribution. Hygiene is a key part for the care of patients suffering from cholera and it is also important in order to prevent the spread of a massive outbreak. Gabriela: ‘Be fair! If you’ve had any, be honest and let other people get it! Some complaint that it stinks, but will you still drink it?’, ‘Yes!’ say all. Gabriela: ‘Don’t fool yourselves thinking it will go away. If your child has symptoms, don’t wait, take him at the first sign. It can start with either diarrhea or vomiting so if you see it, mix salt and sugar, give them lots to drink and rush to hospital!’.
Luca Sola
MOZAMBIQUE. Tete District. March 06, 2015. Francisco Saene, 77yo, seats in his home in Dégué village, Chiringa area, approximately 30km (18 miles) from Tete city. During the last week, in Dégué, 5 people who all used the same water pump got sick.
Luca Sola