Liberia: Rebooting Public Health Services

Adolphus Mawolo
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A year after the start of the devastating Ebola outbreak in West Africa, Liberia has made tremendous progress in controlling the virus. In spite of a new case that was confirmed on March 20 following two weeks with no new cases, hope remains that the country will soon be declared Ebola-free. 

The Ebola outbreak, however, has severely impacted the country's public health services. Many medical facilities unable to handle infected patients closed at some point during the spread of the disease and dozens of health personnel died fighting it. Today most functioning facilities continue to provide reduced services as compared to before the outbreak.

As a result, the population is struggling to access medical care for non Ebola-related diseases. Routine vaccination programs have been interrupted and infectious diseases, such as measles, are becoming rampant, especially among young children. 

Cassia, 7, awaits medical consultation at JDJ Memorial Hospital in Monrovia. Patient often require to be proven Ebola-free prior to be admitted in health facilities, which can lose precious time before starting treatment. Cassia was eventually treated for malaria and cured.
Yann Libessart
Upgrading medical quality standards in medical facilities often require rehabilitation work of the building first in order to offer an adequate working environment.
Yann Libessart
Reinforced protocols of infection control can prevent the propagation of Ebola within medical facilities. Health workers are trained and equipped in order to adapt their practices.
Adolphus Mawolo
Doctors are now being extra cautious when dealing with a medical emergency, here in the intensive care unit at JDJ Memorial Hospital.
Yann Libessart
Increased space between beds help limiting the risk of propagation within health facilities, here at the new MSF pediatric hospital in Monrovia.
Adolphus Mawolo
Laboratories have also implemented reinforced protocols in order to safely handle blood samples.
Yann Libessart
A chemistry analyzer to control urinary, kidney, heart and liver functions and a Rapid Containment Kit for testing blood type, syphilis, malaria and HIV are among the equipment in MSF pediatric hospital in Monrovia.
Adolphus Mawolo
Routine vaccination has been interrupted since the Ebola outbreak started. As a result, cases of measles are now being reported. MSF is working with national and international health authorities to organize a mass campaign as soon as possible.
Adolphus Mawolo
MSF helps local health centers to safely resume activities by providing training on infection prevention and control, here at TKG clinic in Clara Town, Monrovia.
Yann Libessart