Ukraine: Reaching the Vulnerable

Dr Wael during a consultation with a patient at MSF’s mobile clinic in the village of Stepanovka, Donetsk region. -- The village saw heavy fighting in August 2014, with people staying in their basements for weeks to take shelter from the shelling. The village’s health centre, as well as the school and many houses were completely destroyed. Local nurses set up a makeshift clinic in an administrative building and an MSF doctor now visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
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Since May 2014, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has supported around 100 medical facilities on both sides of the frontline in Ukraine with medical supplies, in addition to running an ongoing psychological support program. To address difficulties people in rural areas face accessing health care and medicines after more than ten months of conflict, MSF is also running mobile clinics in 25 locations in Donetsk and Luhansk regions.

A destroyed building in the village of Stepanovka, Donetsk region. -- The village saw heavy fighting in August 2014, with people staying in their basements for weeks to take shelter from the shelling. The village’s health centre, as well as the school and many houses were completely destroyed. Local nurses set up a makeshift clinic in an administrative building and an MSF doctor now visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
MSF staff deliver medicines, to treat chronic diseases, to Hospital no.6 in Donetsk, Ukraine.
Manu Brabo
The destroyed health centre in the village of Stepanovka, Donetsk region. -- The village saw heavy fighting in August 2014, with people staying in their basements for weeks to take shelter from the shelling. The village’s health centre, as well as the school and many houses were completely destroyed. Local nurses set up a makeshift clinic in an administrative building and an MSF doctor now visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
Local residents in the waiting room of MSF’s mobile clinic in the village of Stepanovka, Donetsk region. -- The village saw heavy fighting in August 2014, with people staying in their basements for weeks to take shelter from the shelling. The village’s health centre, as well as the school and many houses were completely destroyed. Local nurses set up a makeshift clinic in an administrative building and an MSF doctor now visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
People in the waiting room of the health centre in the village of Kuteynikovo, Donetsk region, where MSF runs a mobile clinic. The village’s doctor was moved to another town when the conflict began so the community has been without a regular doctor for months. The local pharmacy is closed because it has not been possible to get a supply of medicines since the conflict began. Residents must travel to the nearest larger town of Amvrosiyevka to purchase drugs at one of the private pharmacies, although the price of medicines has increased significantly and many people cannot afford it. Now an MSF doctor visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
Dr Wael works in the consultation room of the health centre in the village of Uspenka, Donetsk region, where MSF is running a mobile clinic. -- The village’s doctor died a few months before the conflict began so the community has been without a doctor. Now an MSF doctor visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
Dr Wael during a consultation with a patient at MSF’s mobile clinic in the village of Stepanovka, Donetsk region. -- The village saw heavy fighting in August 2014, with people staying in their basements for weeks to take shelter from the shelling. The village’s health centre, as well as the school and many houses were completely destroyed. Local nurses set up a makeshift clinic in an administrative building and an MSF doctor now visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
The local pharmacy in the village of Kuteynikovo, Donetsk region, is closed because it has not been possible to get a supply of medicines since the conflict began. Residents must travel to the nearest larger town of Amvrosiyevka to purchase drugs at one of the private pharmacies, although the price of medicines has increased significantly and many people cannot afford it. Now an MSF doctor visits Kuteynikovo twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
Dr Wael during a consultation with a patient at MSF’s mobile clinic in the village of Stepanovka, Donetsk region. -- The village saw heavy fighting in August 2014, with people staying in their basements for weeks to take shelter from the shelling. The village’s health centre, as well as the school and many houses were completely destroyed. Local nurses set up a makeshift clinic in an administrative building and an MSF doctor now visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
Ludmila, 66, with her husband in their home in the village of Kuteynikovo, Donetsk region, where MSF runs a mobile clinic. She says the main problem here is that drugs are not available, and if they are, they’re too expensive. The village’s doctor was moved to another town when the conflict began so the community has been without a regular doctor for months. The local pharmacy is closed because it has not been possible to get a supply of medicines since the conflict began. Residents must travel to the nearest larger town of Amvrosiyevka to purchase drugs at one of the private pharmacies, although the price of medicines has increased significantly and many people cannot afford it. Now an MSF doctor visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman
Antonyna, 79, in her home in the village of Kuteynikovo, Donetsk region., where MSF runs a mobile clinic. She has many health problems and has not received her pension for more than eight months so can’t afford to buy medicines. Before MSF gave her the necessary medications, she was using plants to treat herself. The village’s doctor was moved to another town when the conflict began so the community has been without a regular doctor for months. The local pharmacy is closed because it has not been possible to getNow an MSF doctor visits twice a week to provide free consultations and medicines.
Amnon Gutman