Video: Lives on hold in Lebanon

A VR tour of Beirut's Shatila camp, home to 40,000 Palestinians, Syrians, and other displaced people

Shatila is a refugee camp that runs only 4 kilometers away from downtown Beirut (Lebanon). Originally set-up for Palestinian refugees in 1949, the camp now hosts Syrians, Palestinians, Palestinians from Syria and other minorities (Ethiopians, Filipinos, etc.), who live in deplorable conditions.
LEBANON 2018 © Elisa Fourt
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Ali Othman, a Palestinian man born and raised in Lebanon’s Shatila camp, shows people what life is like as the refugee settlement has grown into an urban slum just outside of downtown Beirut. Shatila camp was built in 1949 to house 3,000 Palestinian refugees. It now hosts up to 40,000 people, including many Syrians displaced by war. 

In this new VR documentary from the Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Forced From Home series, three generations of a Palestinian family describe how conditions have grown worse over the years. A Syrian father recalls the shelling of his home and the dangers that drove him to flee the country with his four young children. Appalling conditions and bleak prospects for the future leave families longing for their lost homes.

Their stories echo across the lives of some 1.5 million refugees living in Lebanon, the country that hosts the largest number of refugees per capita.