Yemen: A look behind the battle lines

At MSF's field surgical hospital in Mocha, Yemen, teams treat war-wounded patients, including many children injured by landmines and other explosives.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
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The Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) field hospital in the port city of Mocha, Yemen, is the only health facility performing emergency surgery for the local community in this region caught between the front lines of conflict.

MSF opened the surgical field hospital here in August 2018, following the start of a major military offensive launched by the Saudi and Emirati-led Coalition on the city of Hodeidah. The hospital provides emergency medical care to war-wounded people from the front lines in Hodeidah, to the north, and Taiz, to the east.

We have provided more than 2,000 emergency room consultations and performed around 1,000 surgical procedures in Mocha. Many of our patients are children, wounded by mines, improvised explosive devices, and unexploded ordnance while playing in fields. Teams also treat pregnant women with complicated deliveries that require urgent surgery.

Photographer Guillaume Binet traveled to Mocha to report on the extraordinary medical needs of people affected by the ongoing war.

Behind the Frontlines of Hodeidah
Ali, 18, has physical rehabilitation sessions twice a week at the MSF hospital in Mocha. He was injured by a mine explosion while he was walking through the fields of Mawza, east of Mocha.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
Behind the Frontlines of Hodeidah
MSF teams in Mocha treat war-wounded people as well as pregnant women with complications, whose survival often depends on surgical care.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
Delivering a baby in Mocha, Yemen
Midwife Furaha Walumpumpu helps deliver a newborn baby in Mocha.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
Operating on a child to remove a bullet
The team in Mocha operated on this child to remove a bullet from the abdomen. Victims wounded by bullets or explosions are often stabilized close to the front line and then transferred to the MSF hospital in Mocha. The journey can take several hours depending on the intensity of fighting and pace of referrals, with many patients arriving in Mocha in critical condition.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
Behind the Frontlines of Hodeidah
Young Nafer Anouar Ali (left) was working in a field in the Mawza region when he picked up an explosive. He has had skin grafts and reconstructive surgery for his jaw. Said Abdallah (right) was also injured when he picked up an explosive device. He lost two fingers, as well as his hearing—and has not spoken since the accident.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
Behind the Frontlines of Hodeidah
A teenager is treated in the emergency room of the MSF hospital in Mocha for injuries sustained in a mine explosion.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP
Behind the Frontlines of Hodeidah
Staff greet a woman at the field hospital in Mocha, the only place in the area where civilians can get surgical care.
YEMEN 2018 © Guillaume Binet/MYOP